Recent publications

April 2021
Joanne Meyerowitz

  A history of U.S. involvement in late twentieth-century campaigns against global poverty and how they came to focus on women.   A War on Global Poverty provides a fresh account of U.S. involvement in campaigns to end global poverty in the 1970s and 1980s. From the decline of modernization...
May 2021
Abbas Amanat

  This book explores Iran’s dual engagement with modern Europe: a fear of imperial expansion and the reception of European modernity. By reinventing the Persian royal tradition and by hard diplomatic bargaining, but also by absorbing aspects of European (firangi) culture, Iranians of the Qajar era...
May 2018
David Sorkin

German Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn (1729–1786) was one of the most influential thinkers of the Enlightenment. Until now, attention was focused on Mendelssohn’s German works—such as his groundbreaking Jerusalem—which have been duly translated into English. Edward Breuer and David Sorkin...
June 2019
Carlos Eire

  The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila is among the most remarkable accounts ever written of the human encounter with the divine. The Life is not really an autobiography at all, but rather a confession written for inquisitors by a nun whose raptures and mystical claims had aroused suspicion. Despite...
September 2021
Terence Renaud

  In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. This book traces the history of neoleftism from its...
April 2018
Timothy Snyder

With the end of the Cold War, the victory of liberal democracy seemed final. Observers declared the end of history, confident in a peaceful, globalized future. This faith was misplaced. Authoritarianism returned to Russia, as Putin found fascist ideas that could be used to justify rule by the...
April 2019
Matthew Jacobson

  When 20-year-old Odetta Holmes-classically trained as a vocalist and poised to become “the next Marian Anderson”-veered away from both opera and musical theater in favor of performing politically charged field hollers, prison songs, work songs, and folk tunes before mixed-race audiences in 1950s...