Recent publications

June 2019
Carlos Eire

  The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila is among the most remarkable accounts ever written of the human encounter with the divine. The Life is not really an autobiography at all, but rather a confession written for inquisitors by a nun whose raptures and mystical claims had aroused suspicion. Despite...
December 2015
Glenda Gilmore

  From two major scholars, a powerful narrative that explores the making and unmaking of American democracy and global power in the twentieth century.   President Franklin Roosevelt told Americans in a 1936 fireside chat, “I do not look upon these United States as a finished product. We are still...
February 2017
Timothy Snyder

  The Founding Fathers tried to protect us from the threat they knew, the tyranny that overcame ancient democracy. Today, our political order faces new threats, not unlike the totalitarianism of the twentieth century. We are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or...
April 2018
Timothy Snyder

With the end of the Cold War, the victory of liberal democracy seemed final. Observers declared the end of history, confident in a peaceful, globalized future. This faith was misplaced. Authoritarianism returned to Russia, as Putin found fascist ideas that could be used to justify rule by the...
April 2019
Matthew Jacobson

  When 20-year-old Odetta Holmes-classically trained as a vocalist and poised to become “the next Marian Anderson”-veered away from both opera and musical theater in favor of performing politically charged field hollers, prison songs, work songs, and folk tunes before mixed-race audiences in 1950s...
April 2016
Marcela Echeverri

  Royalist Indians and slaves in the northern Andes engaged with the ideas of the Age of Revolution (1780–1825), such as citizenship and freedom. Although generally ignored in recent revolution-centered versions of the Latin American independence processes, their story is an essential part of the...
August 2015
Samuel Moyn

  In Christian Human Rights, Samuel Moyn asserts that the rise of human rights after World War II was prefigured and inspired by a defense of the dignity of the human person that first arose in Christian churches and religious thought in the years just prior to the outbreak of the war. The Roman...
May 2018
Noel Lenski

The practice of slavery has been common across a variety of cultures around the globe and throughout history. Despite the multiplicity of slavery’s manifestations, many scholars have used a simple binary to categorize slave-holding groups as either ‘genuine slave societies’ or ‘societies with...
April 2018
Ned Blackhawk

A compelling study that charts the influence of Indigenous thinkers on Franz Boas, the founder of modern anthropology. In 1911, the publication of Franz Boas’s The Mind of Primitive Man challenged widely held claims about race and intelligence that justified violence and inequality. Now, a group of...
May 2019
Matthew Jacobson

  Between 2009 and 2013, as the nation contemplated the historic election of Barack Obama and endured the effects of the Great Recession, Matthew Frye Jacobson set out with a camera to explore and document what was discernible to the “historian’s eye” during this tumultuous period. Having...