Recent publications

April 2018
Joseph Manning

  In The Open Sea, J. G. Manning offers a major new history of economic life in the Mediterranean world in the Iron Age, from Phoenician trading down to the Hellenistic era and the beginning of Rome’s imperial supremacy. Drawing on a wide range of ancient sources and the latest social theory...
November 2018
Abbas Amanat

  The Persianate World: Rethinking a Shared Sphere is among the first books to explore the pre-modern and early modern historical ties among such diverse regions as Anatolia, the Iranian plateau, Central Asia, Western Xinjiang, the Indian subcontinent, and southeast Asia, as well as the...
August 2021
Paul Sabin

  The story of the dramatic postwar struggle over the proper role of citizens and government in American society.   In the 1960s and 70s, an insurgent attack on traditional liberalism took shape in America, built on new ideals of citizen advocacy and the public interest. Environmentalists, social...
June 2018
Robert Harms

  Award-winning historian Robert Harms offers a contemporary history of Africa—one that reflects the continent’s cultural richness and diversity while presenting its history in a global context. A chronological narrative covers the origins of humankind to the present, focusing on similarities and...
November 2018
Edward Rugemer

  The success of the English colony of Barbados in the seventeenth century, with its lucrative sugar plantations and enslaved African labor, spawned the slave societies of Jamaica in the western Caribbean and South Carolina on the American mainland. These became the most prosperous slave economies...
April 2021
Joanne Meyerowitz

  A history of U.S. involvement in late twentieth-century campaigns against global poverty and how they came to focus on women.   A War on Global Poverty provides a fresh account of U.S. involvement in campaigns to end global poverty in the 1970s and 1980s. From the decline of modernization...
May 2018
David Sorkin

German Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn (1729–1786) was one of the most influential thinkers of the Enlightenment. Until now, attention was focused on Mendelssohn’s German works—such as his groundbreaking Jerusalem—which have been duly translated into English. Edward Breuer and David Sorkin...
June 2019
Carlos Eire

  The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila is among the most remarkable accounts ever written of the human encounter with the divine. The Life is not really an autobiography at all, but rather a confession written for inquisitors by a nun whose raptures and mystical claims had aroused suspicion. Despite...
May 2021
Abbas Amanat

  This book explores Iran’s dual engagement with modern Europe: a fear of imperial expansion and the reception of European modernity. By reinventing the Persian royal tradition and by hard diplomatic bargaining, but also by absorbing aspects of European (firangi) culture, Iranians of the Qajar era...
April 2018
Timothy Snyder

With the end of the Cold War, the victory of liberal democracy seemed final. Observers declared the end of history, confident in a peaceful, globalized future. This faith was misplaced. Authoritarianism returned to Russia, as Putin found fascist ideas that could be used to justify rule by the...