Recent publications

February 2018
David Engerman

  Debates over foreign aid can seem strangely innocent of history. Economists argue about effectiveness and measurement—how to make aid work. Meanwhile, critics in donor countries bemoan what they see as money wasted on corrupt tycoons or unworthy recipients. What most ignore is the essentially...
September 2015
Timothy Snyder

  In this epic history of extermination and survival, Timothy Snyder presents a new explanation of the great atrocity of the twentieth century, and reveals the risks that we face in the twenty-first.  Based on new sources from eastern Europe and forgotten testimonies from Jewish survivors, Black...
October 2017
John Merriman

  For six terrifying months in 1911-1912, the citizens of Paris were gripped by a violent crime streak. A group of bandits went on a rampage throughout the city and its suburbs, robbing banks and wealthy Parisians, killing anyone who got in their way, and always managing to stay one step ahead of...
October 2017
Laura Engelstein

  October 1917, heralded as the culmination of the Russian Revolution, remains a defining moment in world history. Even a hundred years after the events that led to the emergence of the world’s first self-proclaimed socialist state, debate continues over whether, as historian E. H. Carr put...
December 2015
Glenda Gilmore

  From two major scholars, a powerful narrative that explores the making and unmaking of American democracy and global power in the twentieth century.   President Franklin Roosevelt told Americans in a 1936 fireside chat, “I do not look upon these United States as a finished product. We are still...
October 2017
Maria Jordan

  In the xvi and xvii centuries, the Golden Age of Spanish Culture, dreams played an important role in thought and practice. Physicians and theologians debated their origins and meanings, poets, authors, politicians, peasants, and prophets were  guided by them, or used them to convince others. This...
November 2018
Laura Engelstein

  A Polish writer’s experience of wartime France, a cosmopolitan outsider’s perspective on politics, culture, and life under duress When the aspiring young writer Andrzej Bobkowski, a self-styled cosmopolitan Pole, found himself caught in occupied France in 1940, he recorded his reflections on...
March 2017
Ben Kiernan

  For many Westerners, the name Vietnam evokes images of a bloody televised American war that generated a firestorm of protest and brought conflict into their living rooms. In his sweeping account, Ben Kiernan broadens this vision by narrating the rich history of the peoples who have inhabited the...
November 2017
Paola Bertucci

  What would the Enlightenment look like from the perspective of artistes, the learned artisans with esprit, who presented themselves in contrast to philosophers, savants, and routine-bound craftsmen? Making a radical change of historical protagonists, Paola Bertucci places the mechanical arts and...
April 2019
Mark A. Peterson

  In the vaunted annals of America’s founding, Boston has long been held up as an exemplary “city upon a hill” and the “cradle of liberty” for an independent United States. Wresting this iconic urban center from these misleading, tired clichés, The City-State of Boston highlights Boston’s...